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Documents  Maladie de Parkinson | enregistrements trouvés : 25

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Purpose of review: The aim of this review was to provide an update on current and emerging knowledge of the neuropathological processes affecting the locus coeruleus/norepinephrine (LC/NE) system, their effect on Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease symptomatology, including efforts to translate these notions into therapeutic actions targeting the noradrenergic system.

Recent findings: Over the past 2 years, work from multiple groups has contributed to support an early role of locus coeruleus degeneration and/or hyperactivation in the neurodegenerative process, including a trigger of neuroinflammation. Imaging advances are allowing the quantification of locus coeruleus structural features in vivo, which is critical in the early stages of disease. Nonmotor and noncognitive symptoms, often secondary to the involvement of the LC/NE system, are becoming more important in the definition of these diseases and their treatment.

Summary: The diverse symptomatology of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, which is not limited to cardinal motor and cognitive abnormalities, strongly suggests a multisystem neurodegenerative process. In this context, it is increasingly clear how the LC/NE system plays a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the neurodegenerative process.
Purpose of review: The aim of this review was to provide an update on current and emerging knowledge of the neuropathological processes affecting the locus coeruleus/norepinephrine (LC/NE) system, their effect on Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease symptomatology, including efforts to translate these notions into therapeutic actions targeting the noradrenergic system.

Recent findings: Over the past 2 years, work from multiple groups has ...

Maladie d'Alzheimer ; Maladie de Parkinson

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Background
Parkinson’s disease is a complex neurodegenerative condition with significant impact on quality of life (QoL), wellbeing and function. The objective of this review is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s disease, taking a broad view of self-management and considering effects on QoL, wellbeing and function.

Methods
Systematic searches of four databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science) were conducted for studies evaluating self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s disease published up to 16th November 2020. Original quantitative studies of adults with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease were included, whilst studies of atypical Parkinsonism were excluded. Full-text articles were independently assessed by two reviewers, with data extracted by one reviewer and reliability checked by a second reviewer, then synthesised through a narrative approach and, for sufficiently similar studies, a meta-analysis of effect size was conducted (using a random-effects meta-analysis with restricted maximum likelihood method pooled estimate). Interventions were subdivided into self-management components according to PRISMS Taxonomy. Risk of bias was examined with the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2 (RoB2) tool or ROBIN-I tool as appropriate.

Results
Thirty-six studies were included, evaluating a diverse array of interventions and encompassing a range of study designs (RCT n = 19; non-randomised CT n = five; within subject pre- and post-intervention comparisons n = 12). A total of 2884 participants were assessed in studies across ten countries, with greatest output from North America (14 studies) and UK (six studies). Risk of bias was moderate to high for the majority of studies, mostly due to lack of participant blinding, which is not often practical for interventions of this nature. Only four studies reported statistically significant improvements in QoL, wellbeing or functional outcomes for the intervention compared to controls. These interventions were group-based self-management education and training programmes, either alone, combined with multi-disciplinary rehabilitation, or combined with Cognitive Behaviour Therapy; and a self-guided community-based exercise programme. Four of the RCTs evaluated sufficiently similar interventions and outcomes for meta-analysis: these were studies of self-management education and training programmes evaluating QoL (n = 478). Meta-analysis demonstrated no significant difference between the self-management and the control groups with a standardised mean difference (Hedges g) of − 0.17 (− 0.56, 0.21) p = 0.38. By the GRADE approach, the quality of this evidence was deemed “very low” and the effect of the intervention is therefore uncertain.

Components more frequently observed in effective interventions, as per PRISMS taxonomy analysis, were: information about resources; training or rehearsing psychological strategies; social support; and lifestyle advice and support. The applicability of these findings is weakened by the ambiguous and at times overlapping nature of self-management components.

Conclusion
Approaches and outcomes to self-management interventions in Parkinson’s disease are heterogenous. There are insufficient high quality RCTs in this field to show effectiveness of self-management interventions in Parkinson’s disease. Whilst it is not possible to draw conclusions on specific intervention components that convey effectiveness, there are promising findings from some studies, which could be targeted in future evaluations.
Background
Parkinson’s disease is a complex neurodegenerative condition with significant impact on quality of life (QoL), wellbeing and function. The objective of this review is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s disease, taking a broad view of self-management and considering effects on QoL, wellbeing and function.

Methods
Systematic searches of four databases (MEDLINE, Embase, ...

Rehabilitation ; Personnes âgées ; Maladie de Parkinson

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Virtual Reality (VR) training is emerging in the neurorehabilitation field. Technological advancement is often faster than clinical implementation. Previous reviews stressed the study design and methodological weaknesses of research in the field of VR for neurorehabilitation. Clinically relevant conclusions on implementation in particular patient groups are needed. The aim was to update the existing knowledge with the recent evidence on the effects of VR training on functional ability of patients with stroke and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Secondary objective was to analyze the aspects of usability of VR intervention in these populations. Systematic literature search (via PubMed, CENTRAL) was conducted from inception to February 29, 2020 to identify suitable articles for two population subcategories. Randomized controlled trials published from 2016 to 2020, investigating the effectiveness of VR on a variety of outcomes contributing to the functional independence were included. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist was used for a methodological quality assessment of the primary studies. Given the heterogeneity in types of VR intervention and outcomes, a descriptive synthesis was conducted. A total of 18 randomized controlled trials were included (10 in stroke subcategory, 8 in PD). CASP grading ranged 9–11, suggesting high methodological quality. All studies concluded that overall VR might be as effective as the conventional training, but more motivating. In some studies, VR was found to have a greater effect, taking the high response to treatment and satisfaction into account. VR training is suggested as an effective intervention to improve the functional ability in stroke and PD patients. Addition of VR into a rehabilitation program might facilitate patient’s motivation, participation and improvement, as this method was generally well accepted, and the results of trials were promising. The consideration of disorder-specific aspects should take place during the decision-making of VR implementation.
Virtual Reality (VR) training is emerging in the neurorehabilitation field. Technological advancement is often faster than clinical implementation. Previous reviews stressed the study design and methodological weaknesses of research in the field of VR for neurorehabilitation. Clinically relevant conclusions on implementation in particular patient groups are needed. The aim was to update the existing knowledge with the recent evidence on the ...

Rehabilitation ; Personnes âgées ; Maladie de Parkinson

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A clinical practice guideline on Parkinson disease was developed by an American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) volunteer guideline development group that consisted of physical therapists and a neurologist. The guideline was based on systematic reviews of current scientific and clinical information and accepted approaches for management of Parkinson disease.

Rehabilitation ; Physiothérapie ; Maladie de Parkinson

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Measures of tongue strength and endurance using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) may have diagnostic utility during clinical swallowing evaluations for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). Thus, the objective was to systematically analyze the existing literature comparing IOPI values of tongue strength and endurance between age- and sex-match pairs of PwPD and healthy adults as well as across disease stages. A systematic review of 12 databases and Google Scholar identified five peer-reviewed articles published in English (1990–2019) that compared tongue strength and/or endurance between PwPD and controls. Individual-level data were published in two studies and provided by authors for three studies. Study appraisal included the NIH Quality Assessment Tool and STROBE checklists. Limited data for posterior tongue pressures restricted meta-analyses to anterior pressures. Meta-analyses of group means indicated reduced tongue strength across 106 matched pairs (p < .001, I2 = 0%) and a trend for reduced endurance across 41 matched pairs (p = .07, I2 = 54%). Participant-level analyses found reduced strength (96 pairs, p < .001) and endurance (41 pairs, p = .011) secondary to PD. Tongue strength (n = 68), but not endurance (n = 41), inversely correlated with disease stage when controlling for age (p ≤ .018). Overall, clinicians should be aware that reduced anterior tongue strength and endurance are as follows : expected in approximately one-third and one-fourth of PwPD, respectively, and reduced anterior tongue strength may manifest as early as Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 with continual decline as disease progresses. Further investigation is warranted regarding the relation among tongue strength, tongue endurance, and swallowing physiology as well as applications of tongue pressure training within dysphagia rehabilitation for PwPD.
Measures of tongue strength and endurance using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) may have diagnostic utility during clinical swallowing evaluations for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). Thus, the objective was to systematically analyze the existing literature comparing IOPI values of tongue strength and endurance between age- and sex-match pairs of PwPD and healthy adults as well as across disease stages. A systematic review of ...

Maladie de Parkinson

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In the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), patients frequently experience disabling motor complications. Treatment options include deep brain stimulation (DBS), levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG), and continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion (CSAI). Choosing among these treatments is influenced by scientific evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. To foster patient engagement in decision-making among the options, scientific evidence should be adjusted to their information needs. We conducted a systematic review from the patient perspective. First, patients selected outcomes for a treatment choice: quality of life, activities of daily living, ON and OFF time, and adverse events. Second, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for each treatment versus best medical treatment using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Finally, the evidence was transformed into comprehensible and comparable information. We converted the meta-analysis results into the number of patients (per 100) who benefit clinically from an advanced treatment per outcome, based on the minimal clinically important difference and the cumulative distribution function. Although this approach allows for a comparison of outcomes across the three device-aided therapies, they have never been compared directly. The interpretation is hindered by the relatively short follow-up time in the included studies, usually less than 12 months. These limitations should be clarified to patients during the decision-making process. This review can help patients integrate the evidence with their own preferences, and with their clinician's expertise, to reach an informed decision.
In the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), patients frequently experience disabling motor complications. Treatment options include deep brain stimulation (DBS), levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG), and continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion (CSAI). Choosing among these treatments is influenced by scientific evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. To foster patient engagement in decision-making among the ...

Maladie de Parkinson ; Personnes âgées

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Difficulties with speech and swallowing occur in patients with Parkinsonism. Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) is proven as an effective treatment for speech and swallowing function in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). The effect of LSVT on swallowing function in multiple system atrophy-cerebellar type (MSA-C) is unknown. We sought to determine LSVT’s effect on swallowing function in MSA-C patients compared to IPD patients. LSVT-LOUD was performed on 13 patients with Parkinsonism (6 IPD and 7 MSA-C). Maximum phonation time (MPT), voice intensity, Speech Handicap Index-15 (SHI-15), Swallowing-Quality of Life (SWAL-QOL), National Institutes of Health-swallowing safety scale (NIH-SSS), and videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) before and after LSVT were analyzed and reevaluated three months after treatment. The IPD and MSA-C groups showed significant improvements in overall speech and swallowing measures after LSVT. In particular, pharyngeal phase score and total score of VDS improved significantly in both groups. A two-way repeated-measure ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for time in the MPT, voice intensity, NIH-SSS, pharyngeal phase score and total score of VDS, psychosocial subdomain of SHI-15, and SWAL-QOL. The MSA-C group experienced less overall improvement in swallowing function, but the two groups had an analogous pattern of improvement. In conclusion, LSVT is effective for enhancing swallowing function, particularly in the pharyngeal phase, in both IPD and MSA-C patients. This study demonstrated that LSVT elicits significant improvements in MSA-C patients. We deemed LSVT to be an effective treatment for IPD and MSA-C patients who suffer from dysphagia.
Difficulties with speech and swallowing occur in patients with Parkinsonism. Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) is proven as an effective treatment for speech and swallowing function in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). The effect of LSVT on swallowing function in multiple system atrophy-cerebellar type (MSA-C) is unknown. We sought to determine LSVT’s effect on swallowing function in MSA-C patients compared to IPD patients. LSVT-LOUD was ...

Maladie de Parkinson ; Troubles de la déglutition

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Importance: Instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are important for independence, safety, and productivity, and people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can experience IADL limitations. Occupational therapy practitioners should address IADLs with their clients with PD.
Objective: To systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions to improve or maintain IADL function in adults with PD.
Data Sources: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, OTseeker, and Cochrane databases from January 2011 to December 2018.
Study Selection and Data Collection: Primary inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed journal articles describing Level 1–3 studies that tested the effect of an intervention within the scope of occupational therapy on an IADL outcome in people with PD. Three reviewers assessed records for inclusion, quality, and validity following Cochrane Collaboration and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.
Findings: Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were categorized into four themes on the basis of primary focus or type of intervention: physical activity, specific IADL-focused, cognitive rehabilitation, and individualized occupational therapy interventions. There were 9 Level 1b, 9 Level 2b, and 4 Level 3b studies. Strong strength of evidence was found for the beneficial effect of occupational therapy–related interventions for physical activity levels and handwriting, moderate strength of evidence for IADL participation and medication adherence, and low strength of evidence for cognitive rehabilitation.
Conclusions and Relevance: Occupational therapy interventions can improve health management and maintenance (i.e., physical activity levels, medication management), handwriting, and IADL participation for people with PD. Further research is needed on cognitive rehabilitation. This review is limited by the small number of studies that specifically addressed IADL function in treatment and as an outcome. What This Article Adds: Occupational therapy intervention can be effective in improving or maintaining IADL performance and participation in people with PD. Occupational therapy practitioners can address IADL function through physical activity interventions, interventions targeting handwriting and medication adherence, and individualized occupational therapy interventions.
Importance: Instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are important for independence, safety, and productivity, and people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can experience IADL limitations. Occupational therapy practitioners should address IADLs with their clients with PD.
Objective: To systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions to improve or maintain IADL function in adults with PD.
Data ...

Ergothérapie ; Activités de la vie quotidienne (Réadaptation) ; Maladie de Parkinson

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While we are still learning more about COVID-19, caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus, finding alternative and already available methods to reduce the risk and severity of the disease is paramount. One such option is vitamin D, in the form of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation, due to its potential antiviral properties. It has become apparent that older individuals have a greater risk of developing severe COVID-19, and compared to younger adults, the elderly have lower levels of vitamin D due to a variety of biological and behavioral factors. Older adults are also more likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD), with advanced age being the single greatest risk factor. In addition to its immune-system-modulating effects, it has been suggested that vitamin D supplementation plays a role in slowing PD progression and improving PD-related quality of life. We completed a review of the literature to determine the relationship between vitamin D, PD, and COVID-19. We concluded that the daily supplementation of 2000–5000 IU/day of vitamin D3 in older adults with PD has the potential to slow the progression of PD while also potentially offering additional protection against COVID-19.
While we are still learning more about COVID-19, caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus, finding alternative and already available methods to reduce the risk and severity of the disease is paramount. One such option is vitamin D, in the form of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation, due to its potential antiviral properties. It has become apparent that older individuals have a greater risk of developing severe COVID-19, and compared to ...

Vitaminothérapie ; Coronavirus ; Maladie de Parkinson ; Personnes âgées

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While we are still learning more about COVID-19, caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus, finding alternative and already available methods to reduce the risk and severity of the disease is paramount. One such option is vitamin D, in the form of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation, due to its potential antiviral properties. It has become apparent that older individuals have a greater risk of developing severe COVID-19, and compared to younger adults, the elderly have lower levels of vitamin D due to a variety of biological and behavioral factors. Older adults are also more likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD), with advanced age being the single greatest risk factor. In addition to its immune-system-modulating effects, it has been suggested that vitamin D supplementation plays a role in slowing PD progression and improving PD-related quality of life. We completed a review of the literature to determine the relationship between vitamin D, PD, and COVID-19. We concluded that the daily supplementation of 2000–5000 IU/day of vitamin D3 in older adults with PD has the potential to slow the progression of PD while also potentially offering additional protection against COVID-19.
While we are still learning more about COVID-19, caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus, finding alternative and already available methods to reduce the risk and severity of the disease is paramount. One such option is vitamin D, in the form of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation, due to its potential antiviral properties. It has become apparent that older individuals have a greater risk of developing severe COVID-19, and compared to ...

Vitaminothérapie ; Coronavirus ; Maladie de Parkinson ; Personnes âgées

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- xiv, 230 p.
Cote : WL359 M236 2011

Maladie de Parkinson

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- 458 p.
Cote : WL359 T768 2010

Maladie de Parkinson ; Parkinsoniens - Soins

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