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Documents  Suicide | enregistrements trouvés : 38

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«Je ne voulais pas mourir, juste me tuer» (En format imprimé uniquement) | Juin 2022

Article (Santé mentale jeunesse)

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Le projet suicidaire à l'adolescence ne vise généralement pas la mort pour «cesser d'être», mais plutôt un changement d'état pour en finir avec cette vie-là, faire cesser les tourments intérieurs, reprendre la main sur l'adversité et nourrir l'attente d'une «vie meilleure».

Suicide ; Adolescents - Santé mentale

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Importance Adolescent suicidality (ie, suicidal ideation or attempts) is a major public health concern. Cyberbullying experiences and perpetration have become increasingly prevalent and are associated with mental health burden, but their roles as independent suicidality risk factors remain unclear. Data are needed to clarify their contribution to teen suicidality to inform suicide prevention efforts.

Objective To examine whether cyberbullying experiences and perpetration are distinct stressors divergent from other forms of peer aggression experiences in their association with suicidality in early adolescence.

Design, Setting, and Participants This cross-sectional analysis used data collected between July 2018 and January 2021 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a large, diverse sample of US children aged 10 to 13 years.

Exposures Youth reports of cyberbullying experiences or perpetration.

Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome was youth-reported suicidality (past or present, as reported in the ABCD 2-year follow-up assessment). Covariates included demographics, established environmental risk and protective factors for youth suicidality, psychopathology, and experiences or perpetration of offline peer aggression.

Results A total of 10 414 ABCD participants were included in this study. Participants had a mean (SD) age of 12.0 (0.7) years and 4962 (47.6%) were female; 796 (7.6%) endorsed suicidality. A total of 930 (8.9%) reported experiencing cyberbullying and 96 (0.9%) reported perpetrating cyberbullying. Of the perpetrators, 66 (69.0%) also endorsed experiencing cyberbullying. Controlling for demographics, experiencing cyberbullying was associated with suicidality (odds ratio [OR], 4.2 [95% CI, 3.5-5.1]; P < .001), whereas perpetrating cyberbullying was not (OR, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.8-2.3]; P = .30). Experiencing cyberbullying remained associated with suicidality when accounting for negative life events, family conflict, parental monitoring, school environment, and racial and ethnic discrimination (OR, 2.5 [95% CI, 2.0-3.0]; P < .001) and when further covarying for internalizing and externalizing psychopathology (OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.4-2.4]; P < .001). Both being a target and being a perpetrator of offline peer aggression were associated with suicidality (OR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.1-2.0] for both), controlling for all covariates described earlier. Cyberbullying experiences remained associated with suicidality (OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.3-2.2]; P < .001, controlling for all covariates) when included with offline peer aggression experiences and perpetration.

Conclusions and Relevance In this cross-sectional study, experiencing—but not perpetrating—cyberbullying was associated with suicidality in early adolescence. This association was significant over and above other suicidality risk factors, including offline peer aggression experiences or perpetration. These findings can inform adolescent suicide prevention strategies, and they suggest that clinicians and educational staff working with this population should routinely evaluate for adolescents’ experience with cyberbullying.
Importance Adolescent suicidality (ie, suicidal ideation or attempts) is a major public health concern. Cyberbullying experiences and perpetration have become increasingly prevalent and are associated with mental health burden, but their roles as independent suicidality risk factors remain unclear. Data are needed to clarify their contribution to teen suicidality to inform suicide prevention efforts.

Objective To examine whether cyberbullying ex...

Cyberintimidation ; Intimidation ; Suicide ; Adolescence

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Abstract: Childhood trauma (CT) is associated with suicidal ideation and behaviors (SI/SB) in people with psychosis. The interpersonal psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) suggests that there are four factors that increase suicide risk: thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capacity for suicide, and hopelessness. The IPTS constructs and social cognitive biases are associated with SI/SB in psychotic disorders. However, the role of CT in IPTS constructs and social cognitive biases has not been examined in psychosis. In an outpatient community sample of persons with psychotic disorders (N = 96) assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the aims of this study were to a) evaluate rates of CT in this sample, b) determine the relationship between CT types and lifetime SI/SB, and c) explore the relationship between CT types, IPTS constructs, and social cognitive biases. All participants reported experiencing CT. Emotional abuse was associated with greater SI severity and higher rates of lifetime suicide attempts, as well as with greater perceived burdensomeness and more severe negative social cognitive biases. Other CT types were minimally associated with SI/SB or IPST constructs; hopelessness was not associated. Overall, negative interpersonal beliefs and social cognitive biases may explain how CT increases suicide risk in psychosis.
Abstract: Childhood trauma (CT) is associated with suicidal ideation and behaviors (SI/SB) in people with psychosis. The interpersonal psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) suggests that there are four factors that increase suicide risk: thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capacity for suicide, and hopelessness. The IPTS constructs and social cognitive biases are associated with SI/SB in psychotic disorders. However, the ...

Suicide ; Traumatisme psychique chez l'enfant ; Psychoses

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Refining Research on the Intersection Between Sexual Orientation, Suicide, and Religiosity | Mai 2022 H

Article (Soins palliatifs et soins spirituels)

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This study examined the intersection of religion, suicidality, and sexual orientation. Given conflicting findings in this area (Lytle et al., 2015, 2018), the conceptualization of religiosity is refined and its relationship to suicidality and related constructs are examined. Data come from the 2011 University of Texas at Austin's Research Consortium's "Survey of Distress, Suicidality, and Student Coping" (n = 20,991). Analyses replicated previous work (Lytle et al., 2018) examining the relationships between importance of religious/spiritual beliefs and suicidality across sexual orientations. Analyses were enhanced with imputation and single regression analysis, and a more refined measure of religiosity was examined for its relationship with suicidality, belongingness, mindfulness, and sense of coherence. The helpfulness of religious/spiritual connections in coping were compared to other resources. Analyses found fewer associations between importance of religious/spiritual beliefs and suicidality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning (LGBQ) persons than previous work. Religiosity was protective against suicidality for heterosexuals, was positively associated with ideation for lesbians/gays, was unrelated to ideation for bisexual and questioning individuals, and was unrelated to suicide attempts for LGBQ individuals. For LGBQ individuals, when belonging, coherence, and mindfulness were related to religiosity, the association indicated better wellbeing for those who were more religious. For LGBQ individuals, a connection with religion/spirituality was either equally or more helpful than connection with a university, mental health professionals, or campus resources. Findings reflect complexity between sexual orientation, suicidality, mental health, and religiosity with religiosity associated with protection and some risk. Future research requires more precise conceptualizations and operationalizations, and the avoidance of simplistic narratives.
This study examined the intersection of religion, suicidality, and sexual orientation. Given conflicting findings in this area (Lytle et al., 2015, 2018), the conceptualization of religiosity is refined and its relationship to suicidality and related constructs are examined. Data come from the 2011 University of Texas at Austin's Research Consortium's "Survey of Distress, Suicidality, and Student Coping" (n = 20,991). Analyses replicated ...

Suicide ; Sexualité ; Religions ; Santé mentale

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Importance Transgender and nonbinary (TNB) youths are disproportionately burdened by poor mental health outcomes owing to decreased social support and increased stigma and discrimination. Although gender-affirming care is associated with decreased long-term adverse mental health outcomes among these youths, less is known about its association with mental health immediately after initiation of care.

Objective To investigate changes in mental health over the first year of receiving gender-affirming care and whether initiation of puberty blockers (PBs) and gender-affirming hormones (GAHs) was associated with changes in depression, anxiety, and suicidality.

Design, Setting, and Participants This prospective observational cohort study was conducted at an urban multidisciplinary gender clinic among TNB adolescents and young adults seeking gender-affirming care from August 2017 to June 2018. Data were analyzed from August 2020 through November 2021.

Exposures Time since enrollment and receipt of PBs or GAHs.

Main Outcomes and Measures Mental health outcomes of interest were assessed via the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scales, which were dichotomized into measures of moderate or severe depression and anxiety (ie, scores ≥10), respectively. Any self-report of self-harm or suicidal thoughts over the previous 2 weeks was assessed using PHQ-9 question 9. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess change from baseline in each outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. Bivariate and multivariable logistic models were estimated to examine temporal trends and investigate associations between receipt of PBs or GAHs and each outcome.

Results Among 104 youths aged 13 to 20 years (mean [SD] age, 15.8 [1.6] years) who participated in the study, there were 63 transmasculine individuals (60.6%), 27 transfeminine individuals (26.0%), 10 nonbinary or gender fluid individuals (9.6%), and 4 youths who responded “I don’t know” or did not respond to the gender identity question (3.8%). At baseline, 59 individuals (56.7%) had moderate to severe depression, 52 individuals (50.0%) had moderate to severe anxiety, and 45 individuals (43.3%) reported self-harm or suicidal thoughts. By the end of the study, 69 youths (66.3%) had received PBs, GAHs, or both interventions, while 35 youths had not received either intervention (33.7%). After adjustment for temporal trends and potential confounders, we observed 60% lower odds of depression (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.17-0.95) and 73% lower odds of suicidality (aOR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.11-0.65) among youths who had initiated PBs or GAHs compared with youths who had not. There was no association between PBs or GAHs and anxiety (aOR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.41, 2.51).

Conclusions and Relevance This study found that gender-affirming medical interventions were associated with lower odds of depression and suicidality over 12 months. These data add to existing evidence suggesting that gender-affirming care may be associated with improved well-being among TNB youths over a short period, which is important given mental health disparities experienced by this population, particularly the high levels of self-harm and suicide.
Importance Transgender and nonbinary (TNB) youths are disproportionately burdened by poor mental health outcomes owing to decreased social support and increased stigma and discrimination. Although gender-affirming care is associated with decreased long-term adverse mental health outcomes among these youths, less is known about its association with mental health immediately after initiation of care.

Objective To investigate changes in mental ...

Transgenres - Psychologie ; Dépression ; Anxiété ; Suicide

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Background: Individuals recovering from a suicide attempt may benefit from support provided by informal carers, that is, family members and other support persons, who may require support themselves. Aims: This systematic review aims to identify and synthesize available literature on the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for this carer population. Method: A search of peer-reviewed literature in five databases was carried out. Studies using any design were eligible and results were synthesized using a narrative review. Results: Eight articles reporting on seven quantitative studies met the eligibility criteria. This included three studies on interventions designed specifically for informal carers and four studies on interventions designed for persons who have made a suicide attempt, and which involved their informal carers. Overall, informal carers were satisfied with support and psychosocial interventions they received. Interventions were related to some improvements in carers' mental health outcomes, lowered burden, and improved ability to provide care. There were mixed results regarding family functioning and quality of life. Limitations: No studies from lower- and middle-income countries were identified and the small number of heterogeneous studies precluded conducting a meta-analysis. Conclusion: Given the low number of studies and their overall poor quality, this review can only draw preliminary conclusions. More high-quality intervention studies are needed to formulate recommendations for effective psychosocial support for family members and other informal support persons after a suicide attempt.
Background: Individuals recovering from a suicide attempt may benefit from support provided by informal carers, that is, family members and other support persons, who may require support themselves. Aims: This systematic review aims to identify and synthesize available literature on the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for this carer population. Method: A search of peer-reviewed literature in five databases was carried out. Studies ...

Suicide ; Psychoéducation ; Familles - Aspect social

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Aim: The effects of a bystander intervention model (BIM)-informed intervention (video) for the general community on participant risk of suicide assessment ability (ROSAA) and protective intervention ability (PIA) were compared with an active control (non-BIM-informed video). Method: Video interventions with 628 participants (Mage = 47.99, SDage = 17.34, range = 18-85 years) were conducted online. ROSAA and PIA were assessed immediately preintervention, postintervention, and at 2 months follow-up (n = 126). Results: Linear mixed model analyses indicated that the experimental and control conditions improved on both outcome variables postintervention/Time 2 (T2); however, the former yielded better outcomes than the latter (moderate ESs in both variables). Follow-up/Time 3 (T3) experimental ROSAA scores were higher than Time 1 (T1) and lower than T2 scores. Follow-up experimental PIA scores were higher than T1 and lower than T2 scores. Follow-up control ROSAA scores were higher than those of T1 and similar to T2. Follow-up control PIA scores were similar to T1 and T2 scores. Limitations: Limitations of the study include: sample homogeneity, small n at follow-up, self-report data only (no observable behavior was tested), fair inter-rater reliability, and a brief follow-up time frame. Conclusion: Current community information increased ROSAA and PIA. A BIM-informed intervention significantly enhanced these effects, which seemed to wane somewhat over time with the effect being lower at follow-up compared with postintervention. The BIM should be explored further as a basis for community suicide prevention interventions.
Aim: The effects of a bystander intervention model (BIM)-informed intervention (video) for the general community on participant risk of suicide assessment ability (ROSAA) and protective intervention ability (PIA) were compared with an active control (non-BIM-informed video). Method: Video interventions with 628 participants (Mage = 47.99, SDage = 17.34, range = 18-85 years) were conducted online. ROSAA and PIA were assessed immediately ...

Suicide ; Suicide - Prévention

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Risk-taking is associated with suicide among depressed adolescents. In the United States, alcohol is among the most used substances resulting in need for treatment. While alcohol use relates to greater depression and suicidality, less is known about these relationships with risk-taking tendencies, particularly among adult populations. The current study examined suicidal ideation, alcohol use, depression, and risk-taking tendencies among adults 18-65 years old who participated in the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the specific aims in Mplus8. A total of 1,740 (21.4%) participants endorsed suicidal ideation. The model demonstrated good fit and findings indicate increases in alcohol abuse or dependence (b = 0.094, SE = 0.01, p < .001), depression (b = 0.036, SE = 0.01, p < .001), and risk-taking (b = 0.044, SE = 0.01, p < .001) all independently related to increased odds of ideation. Increases in alcohol abuse or dependence (b = 0.210, SE = 0.02, p < .001) and depression (b = 0.026, SE = 0.01, p < .05) also related to elevated risk-taking. Based on the joint significance test, risk-taking tendencies served as a partial mediator, functioning as a mechanism in the relationships between alcohol use, depression, and ideation. Risk-taking thus serves as an important treatment target in the prevention of suicide. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
Risk-taking is associated with suicide among depressed adolescents. In the United States, alcohol is among the most used substances resulting in need for treatment. While alcohol use relates to greater depression and suicidality, less is known about these relationships with risk-taking tendencies, particularly among adult populations. The current study examined suicidal ideation, alcohol use, depression, and risk-taking tendencies among adults ...

Dépression ; Suicide ; Alcoolisme

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- 322 p.
Cote : WM420.5.P5 D741i 2020

Si les thérapies brèves sont une méthode alternative aux approches traditionnelles et permettent une solution rapide pour un certain nombre de troubles psychologiques, elles bouleversent toutefois la relation d'aide dans le domaine psychologique, médical et psychiatrique mais aussi social. C'est pourquoi il est nécessaire d'apporter au thérapeute un éclairage clinique approfondi lui permettant de mieux maîtriser toutes les dimensions de ces thérapies. Par leur approche très pragmatique de ces différentes situations, les auteurs répondent ainsi aux questions que se posent les thérapeutes sur des thèmes aussi variés que les troubles anxieux, la dépression, l'alcoolisme, l'utilisation de la thérapie brève sous contrainte dans un service fermé ou avec des patients psychotiques. Pour cette nouvelle édition, entièrement mise à jour et augmentée, deux nouveaux chapitres viennent enrichir l'ouvrage :

– le premier s'attache à l'apport des thérapies brèves systémiques dans l'accompagnement des troubles du spectre autistique ;
– le second se concentre sur la contribution des thérapies brèves plurielles dans l'accompagnement et les soins en fin de vie.

Quant au chapitre auparavant dévolu à l'alcoolisme, il s'élargit et est désormais consacré à l'addictologie dans son aspect plus général. Cet ouvrage s'adresse ainsi aux psychiatres, psychologues, psychothérapeutes, équipes soignantes et travailleurs sociaux.
Si les thérapies brèves sont une méthode alternative aux approches traditionnelles et permettent une solution rapide pour un certain nombre de troubles psychologiques, elles bouleversent toutefois la relation d'aide dans le domaine psychologique, médical et psychiatrique mais aussi social. C'est pourquoi il est nécessaire d'apporter au thérapeute un éclairage clinique approfondi lui permettant de mieux maîtriser toutes les dimensions de ces ...

Psychothérapie brève ; Psychothérapie ; Anorexie mentale ; Boulimie ; Tabagisme ; Anxiété ; Dépression ; Suicide ; Autisme ; Soins palliatifs

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Suicide Rates in US Girls and the Equalization of Sex Disparity in Suicide | Mai 2019 H

Article (Santé mentale jeunesse)

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Though there is growing evidence that shows that ED patients present with high rates of depression and suicidal ideation, there are some novel strategies that emergency clinicians can use to quickly identify patients most at risk:
What are the DSM-5 symptoms for major depressive disorder (MDD)?
Is it necessary to diagnose MDD in the ED?
What are the differences between suicidal thoughts, ideation, gestures, and plans? How can you tell?
Are all suicidal patients “depressed?”
When is it appropriate to ask a patient whether they’ve been thinking about suicide?
What are the uses and validation evidence for PHQ-9, ED-SAFE PSS-3, C-SSRS, SAFE-T, ICARE2?
What are the 7 things that emergency clinicians are recommended to do when assessing patients with exacerbating psychiatric complaints?
Lethal-means counseling, no-suicide contracts, safety planning, zero suicide: what works, and how are they administered?
Do intoxicated patients need to sober up before evaluating them for suicidality?
What is the status of using inhaled ketamine (esketamine) in the ED?
Though there is growing evidence that shows that ED patients present with high rates of depression and suicidal ideation, there are some novel strategies that emergency clinicians can use to quickly identify patients most at risk:
What are the DSM-5 symptoms for major depressive disorder (MDD)?
Is it necessary to diagnose MDD in the ED?
What are the differences between suicidal thoughts, ideation, gestures, and plans? How can you tell?
Are all ...

Suicide ; Dépression ; Counseling ; Urgences en psychiatrie

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- 268 p.
Cote : HV6545 J75s 2015

Suicide ; Comportement suicidaire

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Type
Auteurs
Date de parution
Descripteurs

Suicide [38]

Suicide - Prévention [12]

Comportement suicidaire [9]

Suicide - Facteurs de risque [6]

Survivants au suicide d'un proche [5]

Dépression [4]

Deuil - Aspect psychologique [4]

Suicide - Aspect psychologique [4]

Soins palliatifs [3]

Adolescents [2]

Adolescents - Comportement suicidaire [2]

Anxiété [2]

Patients en psychothérapie - Comportement suicidaire [2]

Personnes endeuillées - Psychologie [2]

Santé mentale [2]

Services aux survivants au suicide d'un proche [2]

Adolescence [1]

Adolescents - Santé mentale [1]

Aidants naturels [1]

Alcoolisme [1]

Anorexie mentale [1]

Autisme [1]

Biblio-Santé - Aîné et vieillissement [1]

Biblio-Santé - Santé mentale [1]

Boulimie [1]

Conditions de travail - Aspect psychologique [1]

Contrôle (Psychologie) [1]

Counseling [1]

Cyberintimidation [1]

Deuil chez l'enfant [1]

Enfants et mort [1]

Euthanasie [1]

Familles - Aspect social [1]

Homicide - Prévention [1]

Hommes - Comportement suicicaire [1]

Intervention en situation de crise (Psychiatrie) [1]

Intimidation [1]

Malades en phase terminale - Psychologie [1]

Mort [1]

Organisation du travail [1]

Personnes âgées - Comportement suicidaire [1]

Perte (Psychologie) [1]

Psychoéducation [1]

Psychoses [1]

Psychothérapie [1]

Psychothérapie brève [1]

Religions [1]

Sexualité [1]

Soins en phase terminale [1]

Stress dû au travail - Prévention [1]

Suicide - Aspect sociologique [1]

Survivants au suicide d'un proche - Counseling [1]

Tabagisme [1]

Transgenres - Psychologie [1]

Traumatisme psychique chez l'enfant [1]

Travailleurs - Comportement suicidaire - Étude de cas [1]

Urgences en psychiatrie [1]

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